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Coca-Cola Rumors & Facts

Wondering about something you've seen or heard about our company or our beverages?

Around the world an increasing volume of information is circulating on the Internet -- through chat rooms, message boards, email chain letters and websites. Unfortunately, not all of it is correct. Regular Internet users are all too familiar with the various scams and rumors circulated on the World Wide Web. Get the facts here about some of the rumors or scams that may concern you.

Email and Internet Scams

Unfortunately, the incredible power of the Internet is sometimes used to spread false information about our products. There are several baseless rumors circulating on the Internet claiming to be part of or affiliated with a Coca-Cola-sponsored promotion or marketing program. We've gathered some of those rumors here so that you can easily get the facts about these false claims.

  1. Rumor: Scam postings claim to show "horrific" video about Coca-Cola
    Fact

    Messages posted on Facebook and Twitter are claiming to provide links that users can click to view a supposedly "horrific" video showing the "truth" about Coca-Cola.

    In fact, there is no such video. Users who try to view the video are instead asked to share links to the content and to respond to surveys requesting personal information. This activity appears to be part of a phishing scam in which perpetrators attempt to obtain personal information that can be used to commit identify theft. Consumers should avoid clicking on these links and should not provide any personal information. Anyone who has provided information to these sites should contact their local and/or federal authorities for advice on how to protect their personal information and privacy.

  2. Rumor: Coca-Cola job offers/job posting websites
    Fact

    The Coca-Cola Company has learned of emails in circulation and postings on internet websites that falsely offer jobs to individuals. Some examples include: 

    • Emails or websites that offer jobs to individuals willing to collect money on behalf of Coca-Cola for charity work in Georgia and Asia. The subject line on such emails may read "Coca-Cola Jobs" and may refer to Coca-Cola Charity Coordinator, Coca-ColaCharityCoordinator@live.com, and/or Tony Cook. 
    • A website using the url www.instanthumanrecources.com that claims to be an official job site for the Company. The fraudulent job application requests personal information, including Social Security numbers and copies of driver’s licenses. The website has been designed to look legitimate by including Company images, photographs and other trademarks.
    • An offer to pay individuals to place signage on their cars or other vehicles to advertise our energy drink or other brands.

    In some cases, the perpetrators have contacted the victims and falsely claimed to hire them in order to obtain additional personal and financial information and in some cases have asked them to cash fraudulent checks and send them money.

    The Coca-Cola Company is in no way associated with this website. The jobs listed on the sites or in the emails are not real, we are not a sponsor, and our name and trademarks are used here without permission. We are currently investigating the situation with the appropriate authorities.

    This appears to be a form of fraud known as "phishing," wherein perpetrators attempt to develop relationships with victims in order to obtain personal and financial information. Common signs that a message may be a part of an email scam or phishing campaign include:

    • Spelling and grammatical errors in the email;
    • Improper use of company trademarks;
    • Sender's use of free, non-corporate email accounts (such as Yahoo!, AOL, gmail and Hotmail);
    • Requests for personal information and the promise of quick financial gain.

    Overall, if it looks too good to be true, it probably is. Do not reply to these emails or letters with any information. If you have already provided any personal information to any contacts associated with this type of email, letter or website, we recommend that you immediately discontinue all communications with the source and contact your local and/or federal authorities for advice on how to proceed to protect your personal information and privacy.


  3. Rumor: "Which do you prefer? Coke or Pepsi" emails and websites
    Fact

    Emails and links to websites asking the question, "Which do you prefer? Coke or Pepsi," are originating from several different companies and circulating the Internet. The emails and websites ask that participants fill out surveys regarding product preferences. The communications promise product, cash or other prizes in return for providing personal information while participating in the surveys. Unfortunately, these are examples of the types of solicitation schemes that have plagued the Internet. The Coca-Cola Company does not participate in these types of promotions, and we are in no way associated with or responsible for the emails or the surveys. We are not a sponsor of these communications and our trademarks are used there without our permission.

  4. Rumor: Affiliation with marketing survey that voids enrollment in the Do Not Call registry
    Fact

    This particular email invites the recipient to "Vote for your favorite cola—Pepsi or Coke—and receive a complementary 12 pack." At the bottom of the message is a statement in small type,"By replying to this email, you agree that sponsors, co-sponsors and participating affiliates of this offer may telephone you, even though you have enrolled with a do not call registry or list service." Because Coke is mentioned in the email, it appears to some people that The Coca-Cola Company is somehow affiliated with the email.

    Please be assured The Coca-Cola Company is not affiliated with this email in any way. We are not collecting information through this email or providing free 12-packs of our products. Feel free to check our Privacy Policy for further information on the collection of personal information. We have no information as to whether or not answering the survey will result in a person's name being removed from the registry.

  5. Rumor: Coca-Cola Jackpot, Coca-Cola Award, Cash Prize, Sweepstakes or Promotional Drawing Winner Notification, Coca-Cola Foundation Cash Aid
    Fact

    The Coca-Cola Company has learned of several text messages, emails and letters being sent to people that falsely claim the recipient has either won a sweepstake or a cash prize from our Company.

    The text messages direct the recipients to a website that appears to be, but is not, an official site of The Coca-Cola Company. The official My Coke Rewards address is mycokerewards.com, and My Coke Rewards is a program offered only in the United States.

    Subject lines for the emails have ranged from "The Coca-Cola Award Notification" to "The Coca-Cola Promo Winning Notification" to "The Coca-Cola Worldwide Christmas Promo," "Notification for Coca-Cola Foundation Cash Aid," or other similar titles. Some versions of the email hoax indicate a joint promotion with the British American Tobacco Company, an annual mid-year Coca-Cola promotional draw (which includes the name of former Coca-Cola executive vice president, Carl Ware), or a car giveaway in Hong Kong. The emails also include formal language that makes them look "official," and are sometimes designed to look legitimate by including images or photographs, a "secret pin code" or reference/ticket number and contact information for a Coca-Cola representative.

    The letters are written to look official and may appear to come from a financial institution. They often contain a claim number and may even include a check that appears to be from our Company or another Coca-Cola bottler.

    View samples of email hoaxes we have identified below. NOTE - This sample list does not include all Coca-Cola hoaxes in circulation. Other hoaxes may exist and may not be included here.

    The Coca-Cola Company is in no way associated with these emails, text messages, letters, unauthorized websites or programs. We are not a sponsor and our name and trademarks are used here without permission.

    This appears to be a form of fraud known as "phishing," wherein perpetrators attempt to develop relationships with victims in order to obtain personal and financial information. Common signs that a message may be a part of an email scam or phishing campaign include:

    • Spelling and grammatical errors in the email;
    • Improper use of company trademarks;
    • Sender's use of free, non-corporate email accounts (such as Yahoo!, AOL and Hotmail);
    • Requests for personal information and the promise of quick financial gain.

    Overall, if it looks too good to be true, it probably is. Do not reply to these text messages, emails or letters with any information.

    If you have already responded to this type of text message, email or letter, we recommend that you immediately discontinue all communications with the source and contact your local and/or federal authorities for advice on how to proceed to protect your personal information and privacy.

    The following are samples of mail and/or email hoaxes that have been in circulation recently.
    NOTE - This sample list does not include all Coca-Cola email hoaxes in circulation. Other hoaxes may exist and may not be included here.

    Sample 1:

    1st Capital Financial Services
    75 Ottawa St. N, Hamilton Ontario
    L8H-3V9, Canada

    MANAGEMENT AND PAYMENT CENTRE
    Sweepstakes and E Games Payment Verification Centre

    REGISTERED UNDER THE DATA PROTECTION ACT: 1998 (C.29)
    OFFICE LINE: 416-939-7096

    CLAIM #:FC/2CA/9LS

    Dear Sir/Madam:

    SUBJECT/FINAL NOTIFICATION

    This is to notify you of your winning of a sweepstake as sponsored by a group of multi-national companies in North America. Your name attached to the sweepstakes number 021-3316-671 with a serial number of 4157-09 drew the lucky number of....

    [This particular letter has been received by people via the postal system and usually includes an enclosed check that appears to be from our Company or another Coca-Cola bottler.]

    Sample 2:

    Subject: THE COCA COLA COMPANY OFFICIAL PRIZE NOTIFICATION

    We are pleased to inform you of the result of the just concluded annual final draws held on the (18th May, 2006) by Coca-Cola in conjunction with the British American Tobacco Worldwide Promotion, your email was among the 20 Lucky winners who won £1,000,000.00 each on the THE COCA\' COLA COMPANY PROMOTION However the results were released on the 20th May, 2006 and your email was attached to ticket number (7PWYZ2006) and ballot number (BT:12052006/20) The online draws was conducted by a random selection of email addresses from an exclusive list of 29,031 E-mail addresses of individuals and corporate bodies picked by an advanced automated random computer search from the internet. However, no tickets were sold but all email addresses were assigned to different ticket numbers for representation and privacy…

    Sample 3:

    Subject: NOTIFICATION OF THE ANNUAL MID-YEAR COCA-COLA PROMOTIONAL DRAW

    This is to notify you on the 2006 annual mid-year coca-cola promo result which holds in this depot yearly. The 2006 edition was shifted from its usual presentation month of July to August because of the upgrades in our systems which occured during the month of July.

    Every Mid-Year, the coca-cola company depot (Surulele Zone) holds this promo from our additional profit, and is assuredly aimed towards affecting
    lifes and as a means of arm to the needy. The annual mid-year philantropic gesture is ten (10) years old in Nigeria, and as a result, the Coca-Cola depot has decided to shift its presentations above the shores of Nigeria till 2012. The 2006 draw was done today the 28th of August 2006 at 8:15am (Nigerian Time).

    Electronically, email addresses were gathered from all over the continents of AFRICA (Nigeria Exemptional), ASIA, EUROPE, AUSTRALIA, AMERICA, NORTH AMERICA, & SOUTH AMERICA. Joan a little girl of 5 yrs old was to pick one email from the wholesome of the email addresses in the box in a random mode, and ticket Reference number *44neh19xxfcoca5ecc* which had this email address was selected by Joan.

    We proudly present you therefore as the winner of the 2006 edition of the coca-cola mid-year philantropic promo award of 5.2 million United States Dollars only (US$ 5.2m). To inform you that your US$ 5.2m award has for long been deposited into the leading bank here in Nigeria, (Zenith Bank Plc) and was deposited on the 15th day of February 2006 therefore is 100% secured and safe until it is transferred to you....

    Sample 4:

    Subject: THE COCA COLA COMPANY PROMOTION/PRIZE AWARD

    THE COCA COLA COMPANY Hong Kong office is Giving Away 1 cars For "FREE"!! And cash bonus of $800,000.00
    The Company is trying e-mail to e-mail advertising to introduce its products.
    The reward you received for advertising for them is a Mercedes-Benz, ML class jeep convertible free of cost! Including cash prize of $800,000,00

    To receive your free car all you need to do is send us your
    1. Full name
    2. Address / contact number
    3. Country of origin
    4. Occupation
    5. Email.

    Within 1 month you will receive a free car. a draw has just been concluded in Hong Kong last weekend (we contacted you via your email address).

    Read our response to this type of email hoax.

    Sample 5:

    Subject: AWARD NOTIFICATION

    This is to inform you that have been selected for a cash prize of £2,600,000.00 (Two Million, Six Hundred Thousand Great British Pounds) International programs held on the 26th of September 2005 in the London Uk.

    The selection process was carried out through random selection in our computerized email selection system(ess) from a database of over 500,000 email addresses drawn from all the continents of the world.

    The Coca-Cola Company Lottery is approved by the British Gaming Board and also Licensed by the The International Association of Gaming Regulators (IAGR). This promotional lottery is the 2nd of its kind and we intend to sensitize the public.

    To begin the processing of your prize you are to contact your claims officer through our accredited Prize Transfer agents as stated below...

    Sample 6:

    Subject: COCA-COLA PROMO WINNING NOTIFICATION or THE COCA-COLA COMPANY CHRISTMAS SEASONAL PROMOTION PRIZE AWARDS WINNING NOTIFICATION

    Dear Lucky Winner,

    We are pleased to inform you of the result of the just concluded annual final draws of Coca-Cola Worldwide Christmas Promo.

    The online Coca-Cola Worldwide Christmas Promo draws was conducted by a random selection of email addresses from an exclusive list of 29,031 E-mail addresses of individuals and corporate bodies picked by an advanced automated random computer search from the internet. However, no tickets were sold but all email addresses were assigned to different ticket numbers for representation and privacy.

    After this automated computer ballot, your e-mail address emerged as one of twelve winners in the third category for the second prize with the following data:

    Ref Number: EAASL/941OYI/02/SHYN
    Batch Number: 12/25/0034
    Ticket Number: 025-11464992-750

    You as well as the other winners are therefore to receive a cash prize of USD$85,000 (EIGHTY FIVE THOUSAND UNITED STATES DOLLARS) each from the total payout.

    Your prize award has been insured with your e-mail address and will be transferred to you upon meeting the requirements, statutory obligations, verifications, validations and satisfactory report.

    To begin the claims processing of your prize winnings you are advised to contact our licensed and accredited claims agent/security company for SECOND category winners with the information below: You are also advised to give the following informations to the claim's agent via email.

    NOTE: All winnings must be claimed within 20 days from today. After this date all unclaimed funds would be included in the next stake. Remember to quote your reference information in all correspondence with your claims agent.

    You are to keep all lotto information away from the general public especially your reference and ticket numbers. (This is important as a case of double claims will not be entertained).

    Members of the affiliate agencies are automatically not allowed to participate in this program.

    Please be Warned!!!: Fraudulent emails are circulating that appear to be using National Lottery addresses, but are not from The National Lottery.
    PLEASE REPORT IMMEDIATELY TO...

    Sample 7:

    114 A Randol
    Mill Rd.
    Arlington,
    TX 76011,
    United States of America

    Subject: Notification for Coca-Cola Foundation Cash Aid

    Dear Sir/Madam,

    This is to notify you that you have been chosen By the Board of trustees of the Coca-Cola Foundation based in the U.S.A, as one of the recipients for 2010 Cash Aid for your own personal, educational and business development.

    Coca-Cola Foundation was developed in 1936 by the Multi-Million groups, which was conceived with the objective of Human Growth, poverty eradication, Education and Community development.

    The United Nations (UN) and the European Union (EU), is donating five Hundred Million Great Britain Pounds, towards the Coca-Cola Foundation anniversary as specific cash aid to over 250 international recipients worldwide in different categories for business, educational and personal development, and at least 30% to be used by each for the development of his/her community.

    In line with the 74rd year anniversary program, the United Nation and Coca-Cola Foundation has established and launched a satellite foundation in Africa and Asia and wishes to use this medium to introduce Coca-Cola Foundation Africa and Asia to the world.

    Based on the random selection exercise from the Coca Cola product purchase receipts and the Internet ip address , you were selected among the recipients to receive the sum of GBP 1,671,000.00 (One Million Six hundred and seventy one thousand Great Britain Pounds) as cash aid from the donations of the (UN) and the (EU) in accordance with the enabling act of Parliament.

    Kindly note that you are not the only beneficiary in your country and your country is not the only country that is benefiting from this donation, as recipients have been chosen from countries that are part of the United Nations and the European Union. The idea of this cash aid is that within ten years from now, there will be notable richness among many unusual people around the world.

    Coca-Cola Foundation, is one of the numerous bodies involved in the fight against global economic crisis, in line with this, we resolved to empower only recipients with laudable credentials, Skills and experience in leading/management so as to ensure adequate utilization of the cash aid, and also to ensure that beneficiaries will invest in organizations that will in turn provide job opportunities for themselves, and their community at large.

    This will empower so many people, and afford them the opportunity to get their lives to a stage where they had always wanted. Kindly note that you will only be chosen to receive the cash aid once, which means that subsequent yearly donation will not get to you again, so it's your chance to spend wisely on something that will create a long lasting wealth to you and your family, and members of your community.

    You are required to contact your cash aid documentation officer (Executive Secretary) (London, United Kingdom, Ext) with the below information, for documentation. (Between the hours of 8.00am - 7.30pm on Monday to Friday).

    Name: Dr. Joseph Maxwell Anderson
    Diplomat Tell: +44-702-405-1081
    Fax: +44-870-495-8377
    Email: maxwelljoseph@sify.com
    Address: Government Buildings,
    Otley Rd, Leeds,
    West Yorkshire
    LS16 5PZ, United Kingdom.

    Kindly be aware that the Coca-Cola Foundation Board of trustees does not know you in person or your biography, this makes it impossible to identify you, or ascertain your credibility as to ensuring that your cash aid will be appropriately utilized.

    You are therefore required to send your C.V on your contact with your cash aid documentation officer.
    Curriculum Vitae (C.V) should contain as follows.
    Full Names:
    Gender:
    Date of birth:
    All Contact Address:
    Phone number(s):
    Fax Number(s):
    Occupation:
    Company Name:
    Marriage status:
    Nationality:
    Religion:
    Next of kin:
    State/Province:
    Country:

    Cash Aid payments are strictly administered by the respective/authorized payment offices of the Coca-Cola Foundation United Kingdom, under delegated powers from the (UN) United Nations and the (EU) European Union.

    Please endeavor to quote your CCFQC (ccf70862) in all discussions.

    *Finally, all funds should be redeemed by their respective beneficiaries, not later than one month after notification, failure to do so, implies that the beneficiary is a ghost, and as such, cash aid will be cancelled and reserved for next edition.

    On behalf of the Coca-Cola Foundation, Board of trustees, kindly accept our Warmest congratulations.

    Yours faithfully,

    Rev. Richard O'Riely
    Coca Cola Foundation, U.S.A

  6. Rumor: Photos for Coca-Cola advertising
    Fact

    The Coca-Cola Company has learned of emails in circulation that falsely claim that the recipient's photos have been selected for use by Coca-Cola, often for a billboard. The emails often ask for a payment to be sent, whether it is for a sign-up fee or the agent's percentage of a promised payment. In some cases, the request for money does not come until the recipient responds to the original email.

    View samples of email hoaxes below. NOTE: The sample list does not include all Coca-Cola email hoaxes in circulation. Other email hoaxes may exist and may not be included here.

    The Coca-Cola Company is in no way associated with these emails. The individuals and agencies named are not working on behalf of Coca-Cola, and we did not sanction the use of our name or trademarks for these emails. This appears to be a fraud in which the sender hopes the recipients will send them money before learning that the offer is a scam. In some cases, the request for money is not mentioned in the original email, and the intent may be to obtain personal and financial information. This type of fraud is known as "phishing." Common signs that an email is part of a scam or phishing campaign include:

    • Spelling and grammatical errors in the email;
    • Improper use of company trademarks;
    • Sender's use of free, non-corporate email accounts (such as Yahoo!, AOL and Hotmail);
    • Requests for personal information and the promise of quick financial gain.

    Overall, if it looks too good to be true, it probably is. Do not reply to these emails or letters with any information and do not send them any money. If you have already responded to this type of email or letter, we recommend that you immediately discontinue all communications with the source and contact your local and/or federal authorities for advice on how to proceed to protect your personal information and privacy.

    The following are samples of mail and/or email hoaxes that have been in circulation recently. The spelling , grammar and spacing errors appear as they did in the emails. NOTE - This sample list does not include all Coca-Cola email hoaxes in circulation. Other hoaxes may exist and may not be included here.

    Sample 1:

    Hello, I am Frederick N Dawson a representative of a modeling company situated in Bristol, United Kingdom. Your picture hads been selected for a billboard advertisment/and local advert here at heathrow airport.Your pictures had been accepted by the Agency Ghost Inc.We don't descriminate sizes or shapes of individual models,we just acknowledge gorgeous pictures and use it for commercials.The Financier will airmail payment to you by UPS courier service.Our financial office is based in Baltimore,MD.

    You will receive a check payment for the contract.You will deduct 15% of the check payment for using your gorgeous pictures for billboard advert; and proceed to sending the balance over to your appointed Agent via western union Money Tranfer for Legal Documentation of the deal and "Comp card".This payment will also be used as "Sign up fee" with the agent.I will be awaiting your urgent response with the following information:

    FULL NAME:
    ADDRESS:
    PHONE:

    For futher information you can contact:
    Financier ( Mr Frederick N Dawson )
    451 BATH ROAD,
    BRISLINGTON BRISTOL
    BS4 3JU UNITED KINGDOM
    Tel:+441618398106
    Our email: ( Freddawson2002@yahoo.com ) Send your respond to our email
    Regards Ghost Inc Model Agent

    N*B
    We awaiting to receive four picture of you.The photos required is basically for a Coca-Cola advertisment bill board at Heathrow airport in london..Let us know your decision ASAP"

    Sample 2:

    Greetings....

    Am James Peterson, I represent H20 Modeling Agency here in london , we wish to select two of your photograph images for a Coca-Cola bill-board advertisment at "Connolly Station" 15 minute bus ride from Dublin Ferry port.

    All we need is five of your finess photograph, we will have to select the best suited for the billboard from the five pictures you send, Once we have selected the suited for the job we will email back the two pictures we have selected and also we need your approval to go on with the job process, Your approval we also enable us process your payment.

    Note: On these contract, You will be paid just for your pictures right away. Your total payment on these contract is 15,000 So if your are interested kindly get back to me on my personaly email address: agency_mailer@yahoo.co.uk

    Note: ONLY IF YOU ARE INTERESTED ! ! !
    James Peterson.
    H20 Modeling Agency.
    Suite 210, Coborn House,
    3 Coborn Road, Docklands,
    London, E3 2DA, UK
    +447023072560
    www.h2oagency.it
    Our Site is Under upgrading...

    Sample 3:

    hi,
    i represent a beautylinks modelling company in London and we have selected your portfolio for a Coca-Cola billboard advertisement at Heathrow Airport. all we need is your approval to enable us process your payment, no commission, no overhead costs. you just get payed for your pictures right away. email your replies to

    Helen Coker.
    Financier:beautylinks london.
    61 Moscow Road,
    London W2 4JS

    [ghosts_inc@london.com]

Middle East Rumors

Many companies are finding themselves the subject of various rumors that attempt to draw the companies and their products into the conflict in the Middle East. Some rumors and variations of those rumors concern The Coca-Cola Company. A few have been around for several years in one form or another and have recently had a resurgence.

  1. Rumor: Boycotting Coca-Cola makes a statement against America and American (foreign) policies
    Fact

    The Coca-Cola Company and our products are often regarded as American. But the fact is that The Coca-Cola Company is a truly international company, operating worldwide in more than 200 countries. The Coca-Cola business in each country is a local business. Coca-Cola beverages are produced, sold and distributed by authorized local bottling partners, who own and operate bottling plants and sales/distribution centers, employing one million local citizens - 90% outside the United States, and nearly all of them citizens of other countries.

    For example, in the Palestinian Authority, The National Beverage Company, our Company's authorized local bottling partner, is an independent, privately held company, managed by local Palestinian businesspeople, who operate a Coca-Cola bottling facility located in Ramallah and distribution centers in Gaza, Hebron and Nablus. The National Beverage Company employs 200 local people and generates employment for hundreds of others in related industries. Throughout the Middle East we operate as a local business, run by local people and employing more than 20,000 local people, with local shareowners.

    The Coca-Cola business is one of the most diverse organizations in the world, operating across a wide spectrum of economic, political and religious environments. As a business, Coca-Cola has neither the mandate to support nor an interest in supporting individual countries, governments or political or religious causes.

    As everybody else, we are deeply touched by the human side of the situation in the Middle East. Given the local nature of our business, we believe that calls for boycotts of our products are not the appropriate way to further any causes, as they primarily hurt the local economy, local businesses and local citizens. Spreading such allegations is an attempt to exploit a delicate situation in the Middle East.

  2. Rumor: The Coca-Cola Company is a Jewish company. (Variations of this rumor suggest that the Company is affiliated with the Mormon religion.)
    Fact

    No. The Coca-Cola Company is not affiliated with any specific religion or ethnic group. We also do not support or oppose governments, political or religious causes. The Coca-Cola Company is a publicly listed company, with shareowners of different religions and ethnic groups all over the world. Anyone can buy Coca-Cola shares through their financial institution.

    We believe the origins of this rumor date back to 1967, when the Arab League pronounced a boycott against companies for conducting business in Israel, following the tensions in the Middle East. The Coca-Cola Company and its bottling partners were present in many Arab and Muslim countries before Coca-Cola was introduced in Israel, and came back to the Arab countries as soon as the boycott was lifted.

    Spreading such allegations is an attempt to exploit a delicate situation in the Middle East, and to falsely suggest that the Coca-Cola business takes sides. Learn more about our community involvement.

  3. Rumor: Warning not to buy Coca-Cola due to possible contamination by terrorists
    Fact

    This rumor claims that a major news network and/or newspaper have put out an alert that Coca-Cola factories have been infiltrated by terrorists and that traces of poison have been found in cans of Coca-Cola. It is very similar to the "grateful stranger rewarding a helpful citizen with a warning about impending attack" rumor.

    Several variations of the "grateful stranger" rumor have existed over the years. The people involved and details of the rumor vary, depending upon the political climate of the day, but they usually involve one person rewarding another with a tip or advice to avoid danger in response to an act of kindness. One version of the rumor surrounds a "tip" not to buy or consume Coca-Cola, implying an impending planned contamination.

    These rumors are absolutely false and are causing needless worry. The Coca-Cola Company has an uncompromising commitment to product safety, and our products are produced and distributed through secure facilities. We use a number of processes to assure the safety and quality of the water and ingredients used to make our beverages. To ensure the effectiveness of our safeguards, we do not discuss the details of these processes.

    We always take reports of this nature seriously. You should know that investigations to date, conducted by Federal and local officials, as well as The Coca-Cola Company, have concluded that these rumors have no merit.

  4. Rumor: Coca-Cola contains material making it unsuitable for vegetarians and Muslims
    Fact

    None of the soft drink brands of The Coca-Cola Company contain ingredients derived from mammals or poultry. We abide by the laws and practices in every country where our brands are sold. This includes countries where Islam is the principal religion such as Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Pakistan, whose governments have accepted our brands as suitable for consumption by members of the Muslim community.

  5. Rumor: Coca-Cola contributes profits to Israel
    Fact

    In an effort to rally Arab boycotts against The Coca-Cola Company and other American companies, many variations of a rumor exist claiming that our company provides financial support to Israel. One widely circulated rumor claims NBC reported that Coca-Cola had announced it would donate four days' profits to Israel.

    These rumors are not true, but have been circulated by ill-informed or ill-intentioned third parties. The Coca-Cola Company is not political, and does not support individual countries, governments or political or religious causes.

    The Coca-Cola Company and its bottling partners operate worldwide in more than 200 countries. While The Coca-Cola Company is a global company, the Coca-Cola business in each country is a local business. Coca-Cola beverages are produced, sold and distributed by authorized local bottling partners, who own and operate bottling plants and sales/distribution centers, employing many local citizens.

  6. Rumor: Coca-Cola runs advertising that is offensive to Muslims
    Fact

    A rumor has been circulated claiming that advertisements created by Coca-Cola depicted the Company's logo emblazoned on the Dome of the Rock and featured images of violence against Palestinians. The grisly images were circulated via the Internet and have been misinterpreted by some to be actual advertisements of The Coca-Cola Company. More recently, other fake Coca-Cola ads have been circulating that are offensive to Muslims.

    These images are fabricated by ill-informed or ill-intentioned third parties who do not understand our business in the Middle East, and beyond. We sincerely deplore this irresponsible abuse of our trademark, which is offensive to Muslims, among whom we count many employees.

    The Coca-Cola Company operates worldwide in more than 200 countries and territories with different cultures, political systems, religions and histories. While The Coca-Cola Company is a global company, the Coca-Cola business in each country is a local business. Coca-Cola beverages are produced, sold and distributed by authorized local bottling partners, who own and operate bottling plants and sales/distribution centers, employing many local citizens.

    For example, in the Palestinian Authority, The National Beverage Company, our Company's authorized local bottling partner, is an independent, privately held company, managed by local Palestinian businesspeople, who operate a Coca-Cola bottling facility located in Ramallah and distribution centers in Gaza, Hebron and Nablus. The National Beverage Company employs 200 local people and generates employment for hundreds of others in related industries. Throughout the Middle East, our business employs more than 20,000 local people.

  7. Rumor: Anti-Muslim messages appear in graphics (No Mohammed, No Mecca)
    Fact

    Some people have been lead to believe that the Coca-Cola trademark can be translated to "No Mohammed, No Mecca" in Arabic when it is reversed and read from left to right.

    This claim is not true. The Coca-Cola trademark was created in 1886 in Atlanta, Georgia, at a time and place where there was little knowledge of Arabic.

    The allegation has been brought before a number of senior Muslim clerics in the Middle East who researched it in detail and refuted the rumor outright.

    During the late 1990s, a special committee of authorities in Saudi Arabia, with representatives from the Ministry of Islamic Affairs, the Ministry of the Interior and the Ministry of Trade, was formed to review the rumors against the Coca-Cola logo. The committee determined that there is no basis to these false allegations and that the Coca-Cola trademark does not connote anything defamatory to Islam.

    More recently, in May 2000, the Grand Mufti of Al-Azhar (the Islamic world's foremost institute) Sheikh Nasr Farid Wassel, said that "the trademark does not injure Islam or Muslims directly or indirectly." Moreover, he stated that Islam is against "the propagation of empty rumors and intended lies that affect either public or private interests." 

    Download the statement of the Grand Mufti of Al-Alzhar:

    Arabic
    English

  8. Rumor: Statement on NBC Rumor
    Fact

    Email messages, Web sites and Facebook pages are falsely reporting The Coca-Cola Company is donating profits to Israel -- in some cases the reports say it is four days' worth and others say a full month of revenue. These rumors are not true.

    This rumor and others like it are false and baseless. The Coca-Cola Company does not support political or religious causes and does not take a stance on issues that do not directly affect the soft drink industry.

    The Coca-Cola Company operates worldwide in nearly 200 countries and territories with different cultures, political systems, religions and histories. People from all around the world own shares in the company, and the company employs people from many different backgrounds and nationalities. The Coca-Cola Company's business partners, who bottle, distribute and sell the company's products, are local business people who hire people in their local markets. The Coca-Cola Company cannot and does not take the side of one country over another in any dispute.

Products and Packaging Rumors

All our soft drinks are wholesome beverages manufactured in compliance with the U.S. Federal Food Laws, the laws of all U.S. states, and the laws of nearly 200 countries throughout the world where our products are marketed.

Unfortunately, the incredible power of the Internet is sometimes used to spread false information about our products. There are several baseless rumors circulating on the Internet claiming that our products or their packaging can cause health problems. We've gathered some of those rumors here so that you can easily get the facts about these false claims.

  1. Rumor: Baby Soda Ad? It’s Not the Real Thing
    Fact

    That ad is a complete fabrication. The Coca-Cola Company never produced a piece of advertising with that image and copy nor did any trade association associated with our Company. In fact, the creator wrote on his blog about how he produced this fake ad himself nearly ten years ago. Check out The City Desk: Fictional Urbanism for info on this and other urban legends.

  2. Rumor: The Secret Formula for Coca-Cola includes alcohol
    Fact

    Coca-Cola is recognized as a non-alcoholic beverage and we do not add alcohol as an ingredient.

    Trace levels of alcohol can occur naturally in many foods and beverages. Governments and religious organizations have recognized that such minute levels are considered acceptable in nonalcoholic foods and beverages.

    Our products are safe and meet the safety requirements, laws and practices in every country where our brands are sold.

  3. Rumor: Bottle caps are not recyclable
    Fact

    Misinformation continues to spread about the recyclability of beverage caps. The closures we use on bottles are 100 percent recyclable from a technical standpoint and highly recycled. They are made from high-density materials selected for their compatibility with most recycling systems. Most recyclers use a float/sink process where PET bottles sink and the closures and labels float. For this reason, and to minimize litter, we recommend that consumers recycle their beverage bottles by putting the cap back on before placing in a recycle bin. Like the PET plastic used in our bottles, there also are end markets for the material used in the caps, such as paint pails and battery casings.

  4. Rumor: Coca-Cola contains pork
    Fact

    Coca-Cola does not contain pork nor any other animal derivatives. Additionally, Coca-Cola meets the safety requirements, laws and practices in every country where our brands are sold.

  5. Rumor: Coca-Cola contains cochineal, a bug dye
    Fact

    Cochineal, which is also known by the names Crimson Lake, Carmine, Natural Red 4, E120 and C.I. 75470, is not an ingredient in Coca-Cola.

  6. Rumor: Common Misperceptions about Sweeteners
    Fact

    There are all sorts of misperceptions about low- and no-calorie sweeteners. It is sometimes hard to separate fact from fiction about safety and health. We've put together a list of common misperceptions about sweetness and low- and no-calorie sweeteners. Take a look.

    Misperception: Craving sweets is bad
    Your ''sweet tooth'' has been with you for a long time. Did you know that there is a 20,000-year-old cave painting that shows a man robbing a beehive for honey?
    Even then, people were willing to go out of their way to get something sweet. Your fondness of sweet things is something that is naturally a part of you.
    You are literally born with it. Just remember: You may need to control your sweet tooth. Good health depends on a balance between calories you consume and calories you burn through physical activity. There is no such thing as a ''bad'' food or beverage. If you love chocolate, ice cream or beverages that contain sugar, you can still include these in your diet – in moderation.
    All calories count, so strive for a healthy balance.

    Misperception: Aspartame causes cancer
    Aspartame was first approved by the FDA in 1981. Since that time, it has undergone hundreds of studies for safety. All of them point to the same conclusion: Aspartame is safe for consumers. There is no sound scientific evidence that is accepted by food safety authorities linking aspartame, or other low- and no-calorie sweeteners, to cancer in humans. When aspartame was first approved, the FDA commissioner said, ''Few compounds have withstood such detailed testing and repeated, close scrutiny, and the process through which aspartame has gone should provide the public with additional confidence of its safety.''

    Misperception: Low- and no-calorie sweeteners promote weight gain 
    Low- and no-calorie sweeteners have not been shown to add weight to normal or overweight adults. In fact, according to the International Food Information Council, some studies show that low- and no-calorie sweeteners can help people better manage their weight.
    Weight gain happens when you consume more calories than you burn through physical activity and normal body functions. So as long as the calories you burn equal or exceed the calories you consume, you can enjoy any food or beverage in an amount that makes sense for you.

    Misperception: Low- and no-calorie sweeteners negatively affect people with diabetes
    Low- and no-calorie sweeteners don't add carbohydrates to the diet, so they allow people with diabetes to consume a greater variety of foods. They can satisfy craving for sweets without affecting blood sugar, which helps these individuals follow a healthy meal plan and manage their diabetes.

    Misperception: The FDA doesn't test low- and no-calorie sweeteners enough before they are released to the public
    The process for FDA approval is a long one. Each low- and no-calorie sweetener approved by the FDA has undergone years of intense testing for safety before being made available to the public. The government review and oversight into the research process are extensive. Failure on any of these tests can require starting the process over from the beginning, taking even more years.

    Misperception: Use of low- and no-calorie sweeteners increases the risk of negative health effects
    There is no scientific evidence that foods with low- and no-calorie sweeteners increase the risk of other diseases or health concerns.
    There is an exception for individuals born with a rare hereditary disease called phenylketonuria (PKU), which prevents them from breaking down one of the amino acids found in aspartame. Therefore, foods and drinks that are sweetened with aspartame must include a warning statement to keep individuals with this disease from unknowingly using this sweetener.

  7. Rumor: DASANI® does not hydrate properly due to salt content
    Fact

    DASANI contains 0.50 milligrams of sodium per 8-ounce serving. Under the Food and Drug Administration's rules governing the Nutrition Facts panel on a product label, if a serving of a food (240mL in the case of DASANI) contains less than 5mg of sodium, then that quantity is considered nutritionally insignificant and must be listed in the Nutrition Facts panel as "0mg."

    You may be interested to know that your local tap water also contains sodium. The amount of sodium in the local water supply varies greatly across the country. The amount of sodium in your local water supply may be available by calling your water company. The average amount of sodium in US tap water can be found in the Nutrient Database maintained by the US Department of Agriculture.

  8. Rumor: Child dies after drinking Coca-Cola light® followed by chewing menthol-flavored chewy candy
    Fact

    A rumor has been circulating the Internet that a boy has died in Brazil from eating Mentos and drinking Coca-Cola light. This is a hoax, most likely triggered by the well-known "Diet Coke/Mentos fountain phenomenon."

    There is a false rumor circulating via email on the Internet that claims that a child in Brazil died after drinking Coca-Cola light followed by chewing menthol-flavored chewy candy. This story is not true.

    There is no reason to believe that Coca-Cola ingredients together with menthol flavor or any other food or food ingredient would combine to cause any illness. Coca-Cola ingredients and menthol flavoring are widely approved as safe food ingredients and are used worldwide in a variety of foods.

    This email appears to be linked to a number of amateur videos that have appeared on the Internet, which show people, for fun, mixing Mentos candies with Coca-Cola light (or Diet Coke®) to produce a reaction that causes the Diet Coke to shoot into the air. This reaction is thought to be caused by carbon dioxide (which gives carbonated soft drinks their fizz) permeating the porous surface of the Mentos.

    However, chewing a Mentos candy destroys the surface needed for the carbon dioxide bubbles to form. Therefore such a foam reaction cannot happen when the two products are ingested.

    We strongly advise consumers to treat with skepticism unauthorized or untraceable rumors which they find on the Internet, since they often, as in this case, turn out to be entirely false.

    Q&A
    Q. Why does Diet Coke or Coke Zero when combined with Mentos produce a reaction that causes Diet Coke to shoot into the air or causes a rocket car to propel with Coke Zero?
    A. Some scientists have said that it has to do with the rapid release of carbon dioxide (what gives soft drinks their "fizz") caused by the candy. As soon as Mentos is dropped into the beverage, carbon dioxide bubbles rapidly form all over the surface of the candy. As Mentos sinks to the bottom of the bottle, additional bubbles are formed and the pressure inside the bottle increases very rapidly. The sudden increase in pressure pushes all of the liquid up and out of the bottle. The same reaction occurs in the case of the rocket car propelled with the Coke Zero/Mentos combination where the carbon dioxide pressure drives the reaction.

    Q. Can this same reaction occur if I eat Mentos and drink Diet Coke or Coke Zero at the same time?
    A. No. Chewing the candy destroys its surface which is needed for the carbon dioxide bubbles to form.

    Q. Will anything happen if I just swallow Mentos and then consume Diet Coke or Coke Zero?
    A. No. The level of carbon dioxide and pressure generated in a 2 liter bottle of beverage is far greater than what can be produced in the stomach.

    Additional Information In June 2006, a video clip produced by Fritz Grobe and Stephen Voltz began circulating on the internet that showcased an elaborate demonstration of the reaction that occurs when Mentos brand candies are dropped into bottles of Diet Coke. The video, created through an acting troupe called EepyBird, created an immediate online sensation and has since been viewed millions of times. There was no Company involvement in that video.

    In July 2006, the Company re-launched www.coca-cola.com as its new Coca-Cola brand site. The new site featured user generated content driven by regular challenges that invited consumers to post their own videos in response to creative “briefs” that outlined a particular theme. Given the strategic direction of the new website, the Company entered into a sponsorship agreement with the producers of the mentos video to create a new, more elaborate video. The new video was featured on the Company's website for one month, along with a challenge to consumers to create their own video around the theme of "Poetry in Motion." The challenge did not ask people to recreate the Diet Coke and Mentos video.

  9. Rumor: The drink Coca-Cola® was originally green in color.
    Fact

    This is indeed just a rumor. Although the famous contour bottle is green, Coca-Cola has always been brown in color, since its start in 1886.

  10. Rumor: Soft drinks can be used by farmers as pesticides for their crops
    Fact

    Soft drinks do not act in a similar way to pesticides when applied to the ground or crops. There is no scientific basis for this and the use of soft drinks for this purpose would be totally ineffective. Our products are world class and safe. The treated water used to make our beverages meets the highest international standards.

  11. Rumor: Aluminum from soft drink cans leads to Alzheimer's disease
    Fact

    Soft drinks canned in aluminum actually contain only trace amounts of the metal because the inner surface of the can is lacquered, which minimizes the chance of any aluminum from the can dissolving into the beverage. An individual would have to drink about 5,000 12-ounce cans to get the same amount of aluminum as from one typical aluminum hydroxide-based antacid tablet. There is no evidence to support an alleged causal association between aluminum and Alzheimer's disease. In fact, The Alzheimer's Association says "…there is no proof that aluminum causes Alzheimer's disease." This is important because aluminum is the third most abundant chemical in nature after oxygen and silicon. Virtually all foods, water, and air contain some aluminum. Some commonly eaten foods that contain aluminum are grains, vegetables, and meat.

  12. Rumor: Rat urine on soda can kills consumer
    Fact

    Many versions of this rumor claim that a relative, friend or coworker died after drinking a can of soda. The rumor claims that the top of the can was encrusted with dried rat's urine. It also states that canned drinks and other foodstuffs are stored in warehouses and containers that are usually infested with rodents and then are transported to retail outlets without being properly cleaned.

    This particular rumor has been around for years, but has recently made a comeback in Europe.

    This rumor about a dirty soft drink can causing someone's death is simply not true. The Coca-Cola Company and all our bottling facilities adhere to a very rigorous quality assurance program to ensure the highest level of sanitation and to create superior quality products. We have very active and strict food inspection systems that regulate all of our plants and warehouse facilities, and rodent detection is one of the most basic things for which they inspect. In addition, governmental authorities enforce strict legal and regulatory systems that prohibit the storage of food and beverage products in warehouses that do not meet appropriate sanitation standards. Naturally if the store environment seems dirty, it is advisable to clean anything you might put in your mouth.

  13. Rumor: Cold soft drinks help create toxins that can lead to the development of various diseases
    Fact

    This particular rumor claims that soft drinks are usually served at a much lower temperature than what is optimum for proper functioning of digestive enzymes, putting stress on the digestive system, causing less food to be digested. The claim is that this undigested food creates toxins that are absorbed by the intestines and then circulated to the body, causing various diseases.

    Body temperature is a constant 37°C (98.6°F). Eating hot food does not raise body temperature. Just the same, eating cold foods does not lower body temperature. Everything we eat and drink turns the same temperature in the body. Most people eat many kinds of foods -- some hot and some cold. The temperature of the food does not affect how the body uses or metabolizes the food.

  14. Rumor: The Coca-Cola Company and Fanta have ties to the Nazi regime.
    Fact

    We whole-heartedly reject the claim that The Coca-Cola Company ever sympathized in any way with the abhorrent acts or policies of the Nazi regime in Germany.

    The real story is back in 1941, when German bottlers were unable to obtain the materials necessary for Coca-Cola production, they developed a cola-like drink based on available ingredients and called it Fanta in an effort to keep their local bottling operation alive. The Fanta brand that we know today is a different and distinct orange flavored drink launched in 1955 by The Coca-Cola Company in Italy. Fanta then became the trade-mark designation for a line of flavored drinks sold by bottlers of Coca-Cola globally that are enjoyed today.

  15. Rumor: Coke + MSG = Aphrodisiac
    Fact

    Some people have been lead to believe that combining Coca-Cola with MSG (monosodium glutamate, a flavor enhancer) creates an aphrodisiac.

    MSG is a flavor enhancer used in many foods, but it is not an ingredient in Coca-Cola. There is no factual or scientific basis for concluding that Coca-Cola is an aphrodisiac -- whether or not it is combined with MSG.

  16. Rumor: Coca-Cola can be used as a household cleaner
    Fact

    This rumor has taken on many forms, claiming that Coca-Cola, due to its acidic nature, can be used to clean toilets and corrosion from car batteries, loosen a rusted bolt and remove rust spots from car bumpers, remove grease from clothing, clean road haze from windshields, clean highways after traffic accidents, cook a steak, dissolve teeth, and bake a moist ham.

    This rumor mentions that baking a ham basted with Coca-Cola produces a delicious gravy -- and that is definitely true! We are unaware of any state patrol officers using Coke for any purpose other than refreshment. Plain water or vinegar would be as effective and less costly for cleaning pavement. Vinegar, naturally acidic, is used as a household cleaner and also a common ingredient in marinades and salad dressings. Soaking an egg in vinegar causes the shell to soften -- an expected outcome because acid breaks down protein structure. Yet vinegar is completely safe as a food ingredient and enhances the flavor of many foods.

    Soaking something in a soft drink or rubbing something with a cloth soaked in a soft drink is not at all like drinking a soft drink. People don't hold soft drinks in their mouths for long periods of time, nor rub their teeth with fabric soaked in soft drinks, so it doesn't make sense to extend these possible affects to normal use of the product. Because our teeth are constantly bathed by saliva, which helps buffer the effects of acids from foods and beverages, the effect on tooth enamel is greatly reduced. In fact, the acids in most foods are neutralized to a large degree by the saliva in the mouth long before they reach the stomach.

    There is a small amount of edible acid present in many foods, including fruit juices, buttermilk, and soft drinks, such as Coca-Cola. These foods are not acidic enough to harm your body tissues -- in fact, your own natural stomach acid is stronger. It is possible that the edible acid in any of these products could have the effects described, even though it's still quite safe to drink these products. However, we don't make any claims relating to other uses. Instead, we recommend using products specifically designed for cleaning or rust removal. T

    The rumors about disappearing teeth, nails, steaks and various other objects are just that -- rumors. These stories continue to spring up and get recycled because each new generation finds them hard to ignore, but they simply are not true.

  17. Rumor: Soft drinks cause dehydration, leading to cancer
    Fact

    This particular rumor claims that 75% of Americans are chronically dehydrated, and that by drinking five glasses of water each day, the risks of certain types of cancer are greatly reduced. The dehydration is blamed on the substitution of soft drinks for water in many Americans' diets.

    All beverages are a source of water. In addition, many foods provide additional water. Soft drinks, like other beverages and foods, are sources of water. The vast majority of healthy people adequately meet their daily hydration needs by consuming beverages at meals and otherwise letting thirst be their guide, according to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS).The NAS report refers to total water, which includes the water contained in beverages and the moisture in foods, to avoid confusion with drinking water only. The reference level of nearly 4 quarts for adult men and nearly 3 quarts for adult women per day covers the expected needs of healthy, sedentary people in temperate climates.

    According to the NAS 2004 Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium, Chloride, and Sulfate, all beverages, including those that are caffeinated, contribute to hydration. While concerns have been raised that caffeine has a diuretic effect, research shows this effect is temporary, and there is no convincing evidence that caffeine leads to dehydration. Therefore, the NAS concluded that when it comes to meeting daily hydration needs, caffeinated beverages can contribute as much as noncaffeinated options.

  18. Rumor: Delhi University student dies chugging Coke
    Fact

    This rumor claims that a university student in India died from too much CO2 in his blood after drinking eight bottles of Coca-Cola too quickly.

    Carbon dioxide, when added to water for carbonation, is not harmful upon ingestion. Like other food ingredients, carbon dioxide has been reviewed by regulatory authorities worldwide and its safety has been confirmed. Carbonation has no documented negative effects on the gastrointestinal tract or on general health. The story about the student at Delhi University is not true.

  19. Rumor: Soft drinks cause kidney failure
    Fact

    This rumor reports a young mother dying from the failure of both kidneys, due to consuming soft drinks every day at lunch.

    The rumor about the young woman dying in Pertamina Hospital, located in Jakarta, Indonesia, is not true. The Director General of Food and Drug Control within the Indonesia Health Department has investigated this rumor and found it to be false.

    Coca-Cola does not cause kidney stones. An inadequate intake of fluids is a major contributing factor to the formation of kidney stones. Soft drinks provide a pleasant and refreshing way to consume part of a person's daily fluid requirement, thereby encouraging adequate fluid intake.

    The vast majority of cases of kidney failure are caused by complications of diabetes or high blood pressure.

    None of our beverages contain harmful substances. All our soft drinks are wholesome beverages manufactured in compliance with the laws of nearly 200 countries throughout the world where our products are marketed.

  20. Rumor: Soft drinks cause kidney stones
    Fact

    We would like to assure you that soft drinks do not cause kidney stones. There are multiple causes of kidney stones, and the ingredients in cola beverages have not been shown to cause them. In fact, just the opposite is true. An inadequate intake of fluids is a major contributing factor toward formation of kidney stones. Soft drinks provide a pleasant and refreshing way to consume part of a person's daily fluid requirements, thereby encouraging adequate fluid intake.

    You may choose to obtain a copy of "A prospective study of dietary calcium and other nutrients and the risk of symptomatic kidney stones." by Curhan GC, Willett WC, Rimm EB, Stampfer MJ New England Journal Medicine 1993;328(12):833-838. The study states, "Sodium, magnesium, phosphorus, sucrose, fiber, and sugared cola were not associated with risk when we controlled for potential confounders."

    Review on kidney stones does not list Coca-Cola/Diet Coke in foods to limit

    National Kidney Foundation does not list Coca-Cola/Diet Coke in foods to limit

    There are 17 mg of phosphorus per 100 mL. in Coca-Cola. This is equivalent to the amount of phosphorus, for example, in orange juice and considerably less than in milk, cheese, and bread. Proportionately, meat products have more phosphorus than any other food. In fact, the phosphorus in cola beverages contributes 2.1% or less of the total dietary intake of phosphorus.

    Below is a table that shows the amount of phosphorus in 100 grams of different products:

    Coca-Cola 17 mg
    Milk, Whole, 3.3% Fat 93 mg
    Ice Cream, Vanilla 105 mg
    Chicken, Light, w/skin, Stewed 146 mg
    Chicken Liver Pate 175 mg
    Ham, Sliced, Regular 247 mg
    Peanuts, All Types, Raw 376 mg
    Cheese, Cheddar 512 mg