Our concerns with Mayor Bloomberg's proposal are well known. We know the Mayor has the best intentions for his city. However, we believe the best way to tackle obesity is by working together. As a team, we can make a lot more progress. People can consume calories from many different foods and beverages, so it makes no sense to single out sugar-sweetened beverages.

We have a record of working together to create solutions:

  • The School Beverage Guidelines, developed in partnership with President Clinton, have decreased calories from our beverages in schools by 88% between 2004 and 2010.
  • Our work with First Lady Michelle Obama's "Let's Move!" initiative placed clear calorie information on the front of nearly every bottle and can our industry produces.
  • We have a program in the Bronx that is educating people by promoting no and low calorie beverages.

KEY POINTS:
RESTRICTIONS TARGETING THE SALE OF ANY FOOD OR BEVERAGE LIMIT CHOICE AND WON'T SOLVE OBESITY.

  • Since people consume calories from many foods and drinks, restrictions on sugar-sweetened beverages are unlikely to impact obesity.
  • If NYC's Department of Health can restrict the sale of a safe, legal product like a soda, then what's next? Will coffee trucks be banned from selling Danishes and street vendors from selling pretzels, slices of pizza or hot dogs?
  • Coca-Cola believes New Yorkers don't need the Mayor to make beverage decisions for them.
  • There is no data backing the City's proposal to target beverages in containers larger than 16 oz. We believe health policy should be driven by facts, not agenda.

OBESITY IS A COMPLEX PROBLEM THAT CAN'T BE BLAMED ON A SINGLE FOOD OR BEVERAGE.

  • When it comes to losing and maintaining weight, all calories count. It's wrong to single out anything for causing people to be overweight or obese. People consume calories from many different sources.
  • Calories from sugar-sweetened beverages are a small fraction of the American diet - on average, approximately 7 percent. Between1999-2008, obesity rates continued to rise while Americans' added-sugar consumption from soda decreased by 39 percent.
  • A sensible diet isn't about eliminating specific foods or beverages. It's about creating balance by staying active, making choices that are right for you and enjoying what you eat and drink.

COCA-COLA IS COMMITTED TO WORKING WITH ALL SECTORS OF SOCIETY TO FIND SOLUTIONS TO OBESITY.

  • To help change the way people think about nutrition and exercise we need to work together.
  • Coca-Cola was the first beverage company to voluntarily put calorie information on the front of nearly all of our bottles and cans. We give people the information they need to make choices right for them.
  • We support choice by providing a variety of beverage options and sizes, including many no-/ and low-calorie options and 7.5 oz. mini cans.
  • We offer more than 700 beverage choices in the U.S. including sodas, water, juices, teas and energy drinks. This includes 150 low- and no-calorie beverages to help people manage their calorie intake.
  • Where full-calorie beverages are sold, we offer people no- and low-calorie alternatives.