Tonight, with a little bit of Coca-Cola and the collective action of fans across the country, the Internet can become a more positive place. 

That’s the aspiration behind an optimistic Coke commercial that premiered minutes ago during the second quarter of the Big Game with a straighforward call to action – #MakeItHappy – to an estimated 100 million people watching on TV.

“The Internet is what we make it, and Coca-Cola hopes to inspire people to bring more positivity to their online actions,” says Andy McMillin, VP and GM, Coca-Cola Trademark. “Advertising during the Big Game offers a huge opportunity to drive awareness around this important topic and, more importantly, to encourage people to help make the World Wide Web a more inclusive, happier place.”

In the ad’s opening frames, teens mock a classmate via video camera. Hurtful comments are typed into a social media feed, followed by more terse words and reactions. The spot then cuts to a dimly lit Internet server room, where a technician knocks over a bottle of Coca-Cola into the mainframe. The soothing sounds of “Show Me Love” by Hundred Waters play while the flowing Coca-Cola triggers a digital glitch of happiness into the Internet as it courses through routers, laptops and mobile phones, turning hateful messages into words of encouragement and uplift.

“Coke is the transitional element in the ad,” explains Jennifer Healan, group director, integrated marketing content. “It’s a creative interpretation that demonstrates the liquid happiness of Coca-Cola that helps turn negative actions into positive ones.”

Wieden + Kennedy, Portland produced the ad, which was filmed in December in Los Angeles, Mexico City and Shanghai. “Online negativity is a global concern that transcends geography,” Healan adds.

The #MakeItHappy movement extends beyond the 60-second in-game spot. On Twitter, users can help reverse negative tweets by replying with the hashtag #MakeItHappy and watch positivity unfold when the original tweet transforms into ASCII art – cheerful iconography made with letters.

Instagram users can join the “Smile Petition” to show their support for the campaign by posting a photo of themselves making a hashtag sign with their hands. Select images and messages will be aggregated on GoMakeItHappy.com following the Big Game.

Healan says the early placement of the ad was intentional and strategic. “We wanted to have most of the game to get people to join the #MakeItHappy movement,” she adds. “We hope to see social media feeds populated with happy pieces of ASCII art, people joining the Smile Petition and using #MakeItHappy to help express how they want to make the Internet a more positive place."  

The Big Game commercial will continue to run in a 30-second format on TV and in cinemas. Celebrities and influencers will help spread the #MakeItHappy message through their social channels, and DoSomething.org is mobilizing its community of 3.3 million young people behind the movement, too.

“We can’t solve negativity on the Internet, but we can use the world’s biggest advertising stage to drive awareness,” McMillin concludes. “If a brand can make people pause for a minute to think about what they’re going to say online, Coke is the brand to help inspire happiness and positivity.” 

Last week, Coke released seven supporting pieces of #MakeItHappy content leading up to tonight’s game. Three short teasers airing on TV and in cinemas feature snippets from the commercial and brief side stories about the importance of transitioning online negativity into positivity. Additionally, four online-exclusive vignettes feature testimonials from teens and celebrities who have experienced online negativity, including race car driver Danica Patrick and football player Michael Sam, as well as those who make it a mission to spread happiness online, like Kid President. A fifth and final story extension titled "Empowerment" was released during the game on YouTube and Coke's social channels.




During the pre-game broadcast and throughout the Live Stream on NBC.com, Coca-Cola ran three creative advertisements – “MVBubble,” “Curves” and “Rocket Launch” – that celebrate America’s love affair with ice-cold Coca-Cola