Minute Maid is inviting social media-savvy parents to forego photo filters and editing tools and embrace their real-but-not-always-Instagram-ready family moments through the “this is GOOD” campaign.

“Parents today face endless social media feeds filled with unrealistically picture-perfect families,” said Ashley Gordon, group director, Minute Maid Marketing. “As a family juice brand, Minute Maid is helping parents recognize that life with kids can be messy, chaotic and beautiful all at the same time, and that things don’t have to be perfect to be truly good.”

The “this is GOOD” campaign includes new TV commercials, digital media, and a complete refresh of its social media accounts including Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest and Twitter.

The campaign was powered by insights revealed in a parenting survey Minute Maid commissioned to better understand how parents use social media to share their families with the world. Edison Research surveyed more than 1,000 U.S. adults, age 18 to 45, in March 2018 and found that:

  • 94% of parents who post pictures or videos of their family on social media admit to posing or staging at least one of them.
  • 36% of parents who post pictures or videos of their family on social media admit to staging or posing most or nearly all of them.
  • 81% parents who post pictures or videos of their family on social media admit to avoided posting on social media because something embarrassing was in the background, while 80% of parents have avoided posting on social media because their house looked messy.
  • 43% of parents who use social media agree they only post flattering photos or videos of their family on social media.

Minute Maid is partnering with influencers across the country to encourage parents everywhere to start embracing real family moments. Instead of staging a photo, parents are encouraged to capture an authentic family moment and share it on social media with the hashtag #thisisGOOD.

The “this is GOOD” campaign is a natural extension of the #doingood platform launched in 2015, which reminded self-critical parents that they’re doing better than they give themselves credit for.